10’ must have fall protection Top edge height of toprails on Guys, ties, or braces must be installed where horizontal members support inner and outer legs when the scaffold has a height/width ratio greater than: a.2 to 1 b.3 to 1 c.4 to 1 d.5 to 1. c. The space between adjacent planks and the space between the plank and the uprights must be no more than: a.1/2 inch b.1 inch c.1 1/2 inches d.2 inches. Note that our enforcement guidance may be affected by changes to OSHA rules. If the ratio is not maintained, ties or guys must be used. Directorate of Construction, 1In your letter, you indicated your question is much broader than this -- i.e., whether your designs meet all applicable OSHA requirements for scaffolds used in construction. should be erected so that its height-to-width ratio is no greater than 3 to 1. The materials you submitted do not indicate that you have designed and constructed the "lock-pin" scaffolds to meet or exceed "nationally recognized stability test requirements." However, another requirement in Subpart L, §:1926.451(a)(1), states: If meeting the capacity requirement in §:1926.451(a)(1) necessitates installing tie-in/guy ties/braces at closer intervals, the employer would be required to do so. [Emphasis added.] 1816 River Bend Road However, in light of the width measurements in your materials, we have calculated the maximum permissible scaffold height for use without restraints. 3. [29 CFR 1926.451(c)(1)]Note: Install guys, ties, and braces at locations where horizontal members support both inner and outer legs. Supported scaffolds' poles, legs, posts, frames, and uprights must bear on base plates and mud sills, or other adequate firm foundation. Many of these requirements relate to the manner in which the scaffold is used and the loads imposed on them. Appropriate fall protection may be required by the competent person for such activities or where the scaffolding is considered incomplete (i.e. erected so that its height-to-width ratio is no greater than 3 to 1.This limits the height of platforms with standard outrigger stabilizers and single span towers to approximately 9 metres (30 feet). (w: 1920, h: 1080 preview size. A 1:1 ratio means that an image’s width and height are equal, creating a square. An aspect ratio is the relationship between width and height of images. Temecula, CA 92591 You can increase the height of scaffolds by … a free standing scaffold shall be considered safe when the. Supported Scaffolds. uprights, with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1, must be on base plates and mud sills or other firm foundation: • Vertically—every 20 feet or less for scaffolds less than three feet wide; every 26 feet or less for scaffolds more than three feet wide. It covers general requirements regarding capacity, scaffold platform construction, criteria for supported scaffolds, and access. As the Agency stated in a 1983 letter, . The captions appear to conflict with the language in §:1926.451(c)(1)(ii) that provides for first tie installation "at the closest horizontal member to the 4:1 height." Directorate of Construction, 1 When we originally received these questions from you in April 2003, it was unclear to us if you were requesting a response to each or if they were submitted only to call our attention to these issues in the event that OSHA were to do further rulemaking on the standard. Either the manufacturers’ recommendation or the following placements must be used for guys, ties, and braces: As an example, a ratio of 16:9 could be 1600 pixels in width by 900 pixels in height. Therefore, it is not possible to comment on the adequacy of a scaffold design without reference to specific use information. RESTRAINTS Supported scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than four to one (4:1) must be restrained from tipping by guying, tying, bracing, or equivalent means, as follows: 1. When that criteria is applied to a narrow scaffold (scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1) — for example, a supported scaffold that is 2 feet wide and 40 feet high — the employer would be required to tie, guy, or brace the scaffold at approximately the 8-foot level and then not again until every 20-foot increment. (1) Supported scaffolds with a height to base width (including outrigger supports, if used) ratio of more than four to one (4:1) shall be restrained from tipping by guying, tying, bracing, or equivalent means, as follows: I. uprights, with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1, must be on base plates and mud sills or other firm foundation: • Vertically—every 20 feet or less for scaffolds less than three feet wide; every 26 feet or less for scaffolds more than three feet wide. Russell B. Swanson, Director To keep apprised of such developments, you can consult OSHA's website at https://www.osha.gov. It should never be used as a work platform while it is "on rubber." Scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than 3:1 must be restrained from tipping over by guying, tying, or bracing. It is usually expressed as two numbers, such as 3:2, 4:3 or 16:9. Our interpretation letters explain these requirements and how they apply to particular circumstances, but they cannot create additional employer obligations. Supported Scaffolds. First fastening device should be attached at the closed horizontal member to the 41 height. Guys, ties, and braces shall be installed every 20 ft. vertically and 30 ft. horizontal to prevent scaffold from tipping. Figure 21-3: Castor-Type Rolling Scaffold Gate Banana clip Castor wheel with brake and swivel lock Brake Horizontal Bracing. Medium duty scaffolds – permitting up to 240kg / squrem; Heavy or Specialized duty scaffolds – permitting up to 240kg / squrem . April 8, 2005 This letter constitutes OSHA's interpretation of the requirements discussed. When scaffold planks are abutted, each abutted end is required to rest on a separate support surface. The general height of light duty aluminium mobile scaffold must not exceed three times the minimum base dimension e.g. Answer: In your question you focus on §:1926.451(c)(1), which states, in part: By its terms, §:1926.451(c)(1)(ii), at levels above the initial tie-in and below the top tie-in, establishes maximum intervals of 20 feet. [ back to text ], 3We note that in the submitted drawings, the outrigger frame is pictured on only one side of the scaffold. Guys, ties, and braces — Guys, ties, and braces must be installed where horizontal members support both inner and outer legs. Dear Mr. Holman: We will be responding in a series of separate letters in response; this is the first in that series. OSHA continues to use the relationship between total height and least base dimension to calculate height-to-base width ratio. The height to base width ratio of the scaffold during movement is. Scaffold components cannot be mixed if they are from different manufac… How can one prevent supported scaffolding from tipping? base dimensions than 5.4m. 15. − The height to base width ratio of the scaffold during movement is greater than 2 to 1, unless the scaffold is designed and constructed to meet or exceed nationally recognized stability test requirements (such as ANSI/SIA A92.5 and A92.6) (1926.452(w)(6)(ii)) Retraining Supported scaffolds may reach four times the base width before restraints are required. Question: QUESTION 14 Scaffolds And Components Must Be Inspected By A Before Each Workday And After Any Incident That Could Weaken Them. A commenter had suggested that the standard requires tie-in at the closest point above the 4:1 height. Toe boards are required when above 10 feet from the lowest level. Answer: No; the language in §:1926.451(c)(1)(ii) is the legal requirement. To prevent them from tipping over, OSHA specified the maximum height of supported scaffolds before they have to be restrained. Guy wires and ties prevent scaffolding from tipping away from the building or structure, and braces are rigid supports that prevent the scaffolding from tipping into the building or structure. Supported scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1 must be restrained by guying, tying, bracing, or an equivalent means. Not using outriggers Sincerely, • The scaffold poles, legs, posts, frames and uprights should be plumb, braced to prevent swaying and displacement and rest on base plates or other firm foundation. Prevention of supported scaffolding platform from tipping . . As the Agency stated in a 1983 letter2. vertical ties repeat every 26 feet or less for scaffolds that are greater than 3 feet in width; and scaffolds with a height-to-base ratio of greater than 4:1 are restrained from tipping by guying, tying or bracing. For a scaffold with a narrow base width of less than 1.2 m, the height of The table below shows at what height OSHA's restraint provision (§1926.451(c)(1)) would require the indicated scaffold model, when used without outriggers, to be restrained (by guying, tying, bracing, or equivalent means) to prevent tipping. Alternatively, guardrail systems, canopies, or catch platforms may be installed to retain materials. [ back to text ], 2Agency's October 13, 1983, letter from John B. A supported scaffold with a height-to-base ratio (including outriggers supports, if used) of more than four to one (4:1) shall be restrained from tipping by guying, tying, bracing or equivalent means as follows: . The height of the scaffold work platform does not exceed the height to base width ratio defined in AS4576. The aspect ratio of molded feature height versus feature width for scaffolds was as high as 5:1 (150-μm strut height; 30-μm strut width), which exceeded previous reports for replica-molded PGS scaffolds in which the feature height-versus-width ratios were 2:1 or lower. Except as provided in paragraphs (a)(2), (a)(3), (a)(4), (a)(5) and (g) of this section, each scaffold and scaffold component shall be capable of supporting, without failure, its own weight and at least 4 times the maximum intended load applied or transmitted to it. How can one prevent supported scaffolding from tipping? A platform greater than 10 feet in length shall not extend over its support more than 18 inches, unless it is designed and installed so that the cantilevered portion of the platform is able to support employees without tipping, or has guardrails which block employee access to the cantilevered end; Page 4 3.4.1.10. Is this, in fact, permitted? Please consult the OSHA standard 29 CFR 1926.451 for these types of scaffold situations. Or, it could be 1920 x 1080, 1280 x 720, or any other width/height combinations that can be calculated to equal 16:9. Employees are required to wear hardhats on scaffolding to protect them dropped items. [ back to text ], Occupational Safety & Health Administration. First, please note that OSHA neither approves nor endorses products. (c) Criteria for supported scaffolds. 1 If (as one example) the user were to add 2-foot outriggers at each corner and perpendicular to the long side of the scaffold base section, the base width dimension would increase to such an extent that it becomes greater than the nominal length. So a 2 feet wide scaffold may reach 8 feet in height without using restraints. (1) You must make sure supported scaffolds with a height to least base di-mension ratio of greater than four to one are prevented from tipping by one or more of the following: (a) Guying; (b) Tying; (c) Bracing; (d) Other equivalent means. Scaffolding must be erected, altered, moved, and dismantled in accordance with applicable OSHA standards and under the supervision of a scaffold competent person. Supported scaffolds platform with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1 must be restrained by guying, tying, bracing, or an equivalent means. • Any scaffold with a height-to-base width ratio of 4-to-1 or greater should be restrained from tipping by means of outriggers, guying, tying or bracing. All scaffolds with a height to base ratio of more than four to one must be secured to the structure or guyed to prevent the scaffold from tipping over. Note that our enforcement guidance may be affected by changes to OSHA rules. Question 1(b): Non-mandatory Appendix E to Subpart L purports to contain two illustrations of the maximum vertical tie spacing on supported scaffolds as required by §:1926.451(c)(1)(ii). The platform height of a rolling scaffold must not exceed four (4) times the smallest base dimension (Cal/OSHA and some Government agencies require a stricter ratio of 3 to 1) Always keep casters locked while on scaffold. In the United States, the OSHA requires such bracing when a scaffold's height to width ratio 4 to 1 or greater. We attempted to resolve that with you, but we were unable to obtain a response; consequently, our office closed the file. Using outriggers Based on the information you provided, we were unable to calculate the scaffold's total height. OSHA's decision to reject that suggestion was explained in the Preamble's discussion of §:1926.451(c)(1)(ii) in Volume 61 of the Federal Register at page 46042: We appreciate your pointing out that the captions in the Non-mandatory Appendix are in error. missing parts due to area obstructions). OSHA does not agree with the SIA suggestion that guys, ties, and braces be installed at the closest horizontal member. OSHA requirements are set by statute, standards and regulations. • The scaffold components, if produced by different manufacturers or with dissimilar materials, should fit together without force, while maintaining the structural integrity of the scaffold. Glock Slide Removal Tool Amazon, Lvn To Bsn Programs, Sow Exotic Nursery Winter Haven, Fl, Northwest Football Programmes, Last Thing I Needed First Thing This Morning'' Live, Austrian Gold Coins Prices, Large Makeup Brush Holder, Who Killed Sasha Aot, Allen 303db Deluxe 3 Bike Trunk Rack, " />

supported scaffolds with height to width ratios greater than

Supported scaffolds must be restrained from tipping by way of tying, bracing or an equivalent means if it has a height-to-base-width ratio of more than 4:1. OSHA requirements are set by statute, standards and regulations. 1926.451(c)(2)(i) and (ii) Restraining. II. WAC 296-874-40004 Prevent supported scaffolds from tipping. 21-4 Construction Health and Safety Manual SCAFFOLDS 2. WAC 296-874-40004 Prevent supported scaffolds from tipping. It is usually expressed as two numbers, such as 3:2, 4:3 or 16:9. Supported scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than 41 must be restrained from tipping by guying, tying, or bracing. Height to base width ratio. Background If you need additional information, please contact us by fax (202-693-1689) at: U.S. Department of Labor, OSHA, Office of Construction Standards and Guidance. Working Out Height Capacity of Scaffolding The load capacity of scaffolding is determined by a height to base ratio of 4:1, Meaning the scaffold can be up to four times the minimal base width. 2. The scaffold should always be resting on the outriggers while workers are aboard. • Horizontally—at each end; at intervals not to Section 1926.451(c)(1) states: Criteria for supported scaffolds. Every 20 feet after for scaffolds less than 3 feet wide, 26 feet for ones wider than 3 feet. Scaffolds sometimes require support such as guying, tying, and bracing. The width is always the first number. • Horizontally—at each end; at intervals not to Dear Mr. Beauchamp: We will be making a technical correction to the Non-mandatory Appendix so that it reflects the language in §:1926.451(c)(1)(ii). The checklist does not address criteria for suspension scaffolds, suspension ropes, and stairtowers. Mobile scaffolds must meet a stricter height to base width ratio if workers remain on the scaffold during movement. 40106 Roshani Drive When that criteria is applied to a narrow scaffold (scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1) — for example, a supported scaffold that is 2 feet wide and 40 feet high — the employer would be required to tie, guy, or brace the scaffold at approximately the 8-foot level and then not again until every 20-foot increment. loaded scaffold Scaffold uprights must be plumb and braced to prevent swaying Install guys, ties, and braces to prevent tipping Supported scaffolds with a height-to-base width ratio greater than 4:1 must be tied to the structure Business & Legal Reports, Inc. However, where appropriate, we try to give some guidance to employers to help them assess whether products are appropriate to use and provide OSHA-required protection. (1) Supported scaffolds with a height to base width (including outrigger supports, if used) ratio of more than four to one (4:1) shall be restrained from tipping by … b. [29 CFR 1926.451(c)(1)]Note: Install guys, ties, and braces at locations where horizontal members support both inner and outer legs. In short, in light of this and in view of the limited amount of information submitted, we are able to comment only on the applicable requirements for the base width-to-height ratio. This is reflected in the rule's preamble, in which the Agency discusses the issue of whether to require tie-off at the closest horizontal member to the 4:1 height or at the closest point above the 4:1 height. We apologize for the misunderstanding and resulting delay in providing this response. Mobile (Rolling) Scaffold Height must not exceed four times the . )Footings must support loaded scaffoldScaffold uprights mustbe plumb and braced toprevent swayingInstall guys, ties, andbraces to prevent tippingSupported scaffolds witha height-to-base widthratio greater than 4:1must be tied to thestructureBusiness & Legal Reports, Inc. Question: Do the designs that I have submitted regarding "lock-pin" mobile scaffolds meet applicable OSHA construction requirements for height-to-base width ratios for supported scaffolds? Note also that, under §1926.452(w)(6)(iii), when a worker rides on a scaffold, If you need additional information, please contact us by fax (202-693-1689) at: U.S. Department of Labor, OSHA, Office of Construction Standards and Guidance. Either the manufacturers’ recommendation or the following placements must be used for guys, ties, and braces: With prescribed post spacing the scaffold height in this case can be up to 125 feet. Guys, ties and braces shall be installed where horizontal members support both inner and outer legs. Scaffolds erected on farm wagons or other devices with pneumatic tires are frequently used for installing sheet metal siding and similar materials on industrial buildings. Figure 21-4: Farm Wagon-Type Rolling Scaffold In each of those illustrations, there are identical captions that read, "First tie closest frame header or bearer above 4 times the minimum base dimension." 1926.451(c)(1) How can one prevent supported … Sincerely, Don’t Ride a Rolling Scaffold Begin with Good Footings Supported scaffolds with a height to base width (including outrigger supports, if used) ratio of more than four to one (4:1) shall be restrained from tipping by guying, tying, bracing, or equivalent means, as follows: 1926.451(c)(1)(i) Guys, ties, and braces shall be installed at locations where horizontal members support both inner and outer legs. Your materials describe three "lock-pin" scaffold models. I apologize for the delay in our completing this letter. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Severe Storm and Flood Recovery Assistance. [29 CFR 1926.451(c)(1)] Note: Guys, ties, and braces must be installed at locations where horizontal members support both inner and outer legs. Guys, ties, and braces must be installed according to the scaffold manufacturers recommendations or at the closest horizontal member to the 4:1 Height ratio and be repeated every 20 vertical feet for narrow scaffolds (3ft or less in width), and Every 26 vertical feet for scaffold greater than 3 feet in width An aspect ratio is the relationship between width and height of images. • Any scaffold with a height-to-base width ratio of 4-to-1 or greater should be restrained from tipping by means of outriggers, guying, tying or bracing. I believe that this criteria is insufficient and allows for an unsafe condition. Supported scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1 must be restrained by guying, tying, bracing, or an equivalent means. We appreciate your pointing out that the captions in the Non-mandatory Appendix are in error. They must be placed every 20 feet vertically and every 30 feet horizontally for scaffolds 3 feet wide or less. [ back to text ], Occupational Safety & Health Administration, In 1983, OSHA explained that, for the purposes of the scaffold height-to-base width ratio, the Agency uses the "total height" in relationship to the smaller base dimension. Rather than hard-coding the aspect-ratio, this uses the attr CSS function to create the appropriate aspect-ratio based on the image width and height attributes provided by the HTML. We will refer to them respectively as the 4-foot, 6-foot and 7-foot models. If meeting the capacity requirement in §:1926.451(a)(1) necessitates installing tie-in/guy ties/braces at closer intervals, the employer would be required to do so. To keep apprised of such developments, you can consult OSHA's website at https://www.osha.gov. Only for independent, tower and mobile scaffolds the 1:4 (1 base width to 4 height) ratio is applicable. Supported scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1 must be restrained by guying, tying, bracing, or an equivalent means. Either the manufacturers’ recommendation or the following placements must be used for guys, ties, and braces: The placement of ties for scaffolds wider than 3 feet may not exceed 26 feet vertically. First fastening device should be attached at the closed horizontal member to the 41 height. This is required when a height to base width ratio is greater than 4:1. . Also, from time to time we update our guidance in response to new information. The 4-foot scaffold becomes 4 ft. by 6.167 ft.; the 6-foot scaffold becomes 6 ft. by 6.417 ft.; the 7-foot scaffold becomes 7 ft. by 7.333 ft. Tie-in requirements for supported scaffolds; errors in Non-Mandatory Appendix E. You can also contact us by mail at U.S. Department of Labor, OSHA, Office of Construction Standards and Guidance, Room N3468, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20210, although there will be a delay in our receiving correspondence by mail. It is subject to the 3-to-1 height-to-width ratio and is impractical for heights greater than 7.5 m (25 ft). Supported Scaffolds (cont. OSHA continues to use the relationship between total height and least base dimension to calculate height-to-base width ratio. Russell B. Swanson, Director Our analysis shows the base geometry changes on all three models. Mr. Douglas A. Holman However, our calculations in the tables were based on using outriggers on both sides. If they in fact have not been so designed, the heights listed in the tables above would have to be lowered to meet the 2:1 ratio for use of the scaffolds when they are moved with workers on them. Question 1(a): Section 1926.451(c)(1)(ii) contains criteria establishing tie-in requirements for supported scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than four to one. III. Do the captions in the Non-mandatory Appendix override the requirement in §:1926.451(c)(1)(ii)? If you need additional information, please contact us by fax at: U.S. Department of Labor, OSHA, Directorate of Construction, Office of Construction Standards and Guidance, fax # 202-693-1689. Criteria for Supported Scaffolds 1. Supported scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1 need base plates on stable level ground Hook-on ladders minimum rung length of 11.5”, max 16.5” Clearance between scaffolds and power lines: o Uninsulated <50kV is 10’ o Insulated <300V is 3’ Employee on scaffold >10’ must have fall protection Top edge height of toprails on Guys, ties, or braces must be installed where horizontal members support inner and outer legs when the scaffold has a height/width ratio greater than: a.2 to 1 b.3 to 1 c.4 to 1 d.5 to 1. c. The space between adjacent planks and the space between the plank and the uprights must be no more than: a.1/2 inch b.1 inch c.1 1/2 inches d.2 inches. Note that our enforcement guidance may be affected by changes to OSHA rules. If the ratio is not maintained, ties or guys must be used. Directorate of Construction, 1In your letter, you indicated your question is much broader than this -- i.e., whether your designs meet all applicable OSHA requirements for scaffolds used in construction. should be erected so that its height-to-width ratio is no greater than 3 to 1. The materials you submitted do not indicate that you have designed and constructed the "lock-pin" scaffolds to meet or exceed "nationally recognized stability test requirements." However, another requirement in Subpart L, §:1926.451(a)(1), states: If meeting the capacity requirement in §:1926.451(a)(1) necessitates installing tie-in/guy ties/braces at closer intervals, the employer would be required to do so. [Emphasis added.] 1816 River Bend Road However, in light of the width measurements in your materials, we have calculated the maximum permissible scaffold height for use without restraints. 3. [29 CFR 1926.451(c)(1)]Note: Install guys, ties, and braces at locations where horizontal members support both inner and outer legs. Supported scaffolds' poles, legs, posts, frames, and uprights must bear on base plates and mud sills, or other adequate firm foundation. Many of these requirements relate to the manner in which the scaffold is used and the loads imposed on them. Appropriate fall protection may be required by the competent person for such activities or where the scaffolding is considered incomplete (i.e. erected so that its height-to-width ratio is no greater than 3 to 1.This limits the height of platforms with standard outrigger stabilizers and single span towers to approximately 9 metres (30 feet). (w: 1920, h: 1080 preview size. A 1:1 ratio means that an image’s width and height are equal, creating a square. An aspect ratio is the relationship between width and height of images. Temecula, CA 92591 You can increase the height of scaffolds by … a free standing scaffold shall be considered safe when the. Supported Scaffolds. uprights, with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1, must be on base plates and mud sills or other firm foundation: • Vertically—every 20 feet or less for scaffolds less than three feet wide; every 26 feet or less for scaffolds more than three feet wide. It covers general requirements regarding capacity, scaffold platform construction, criteria for supported scaffolds, and access. As the Agency stated in a 1983 letter, . The captions appear to conflict with the language in §:1926.451(c)(1)(ii) that provides for first tie installation "at the closest horizontal member to the 4:1 height." Directorate of Construction, 1 When we originally received these questions from you in April 2003, it was unclear to us if you were requesting a response to each or if they were submitted only to call our attention to these issues in the event that OSHA were to do further rulemaking on the standard. Either the manufacturers’ recommendation or the following placements must be used for guys, ties, and braces: As an example, a ratio of 16:9 could be 1600 pixels in width by 900 pixels in height. Therefore, it is not possible to comment on the adequacy of a scaffold design without reference to specific use information. RESTRAINTS Supported scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than four to one (4:1) must be restrained from tipping by guying, tying, bracing, or equivalent means, as follows: 1. When that criteria is applied to a narrow scaffold (scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1) — for example, a supported scaffold that is 2 feet wide and 40 feet high — the employer would be required to tie, guy, or brace the scaffold at approximately the 8-foot level and then not again until every 20-foot increment. (1) Supported scaffolds with a height to base width (including outrigger supports, if used) ratio of more than four to one (4:1) shall be restrained from tipping by guying, tying, bracing, or equivalent means, as follows: I. uprights, with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1, must be on base plates and mud sills or other firm foundation: • Vertically—every 20 feet or less for scaffolds less than three feet wide; every 26 feet or less for scaffolds more than three feet wide. Russell B. Swanson, Director To keep apprised of such developments, you can consult OSHA's website at https://www.osha.gov. It should never be used as a work platform while it is "on rubber." Scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than 3:1 must be restrained from tipping over by guying, tying, or bracing. It is usually expressed as two numbers, such as 3:2, 4:3 or 16:9. Our interpretation letters explain these requirements and how they apply to particular circumstances, but they cannot create additional employer obligations. Supported Scaffolds. First fastening device should be attached at the closed horizontal member to the 41 height. Guys, ties, and braces shall be installed every 20 ft. vertically and 30 ft. horizontal to prevent scaffold from tipping. Figure 21-3: Castor-Type Rolling Scaffold Gate Banana clip Castor wheel with brake and swivel lock Brake Horizontal Bracing. Medium duty scaffolds – permitting up to 240kg / squrem; Heavy or Specialized duty scaffolds – permitting up to 240kg / squrem . April 8, 2005 This letter constitutes OSHA's interpretation of the requirements discussed. When scaffold planks are abutted, each abutted end is required to rest on a separate support surface. The general height of light duty aluminium mobile scaffold must not exceed three times the minimum base dimension e.g. Answer: In your question you focus on §:1926.451(c)(1), which states, in part: By its terms, §:1926.451(c)(1)(ii), at levels above the initial tie-in and below the top tie-in, establishes maximum intervals of 20 feet. [ back to text ], 3We note that in the submitted drawings, the outrigger frame is pictured on only one side of the scaffold. Guys, ties, and braces — Guys, ties, and braces must be installed where horizontal members support both inner and outer legs. Dear Mr. Holman: We will be responding in a series of separate letters in response; this is the first in that series. OSHA continues to use the relationship between total height and least base dimension to calculate height-to-base width ratio. The height to base width ratio of the scaffold during movement is. Scaffold components cannot be mixed if they are from different manufac… How can one prevent supported scaffolding from tipping? base dimensions than 5.4m. 15. − The height to base width ratio of the scaffold during movement is greater than 2 to 1, unless the scaffold is designed and constructed to meet or exceed nationally recognized stability test requirements (such as ANSI/SIA A92.5 and A92.6) (1926.452(w)(6)(ii)) Retraining Supported scaffolds may reach four times the base width before restraints are required. Question: QUESTION 14 Scaffolds And Components Must Be Inspected By A Before Each Workday And After Any Incident That Could Weaken Them. A commenter had suggested that the standard requires tie-in at the closest point above the 4:1 height. Toe boards are required when above 10 feet from the lowest level. Answer: No; the language in §:1926.451(c)(1)(ii) is the legal requirement. To prevent them from tipping over, OSHA specified the maximum height of supported scaffolds before they have to be restrained. Guy wires and ties prevent scaffolding from tipping away from the building or structure, and braces are rigid supports that prevent the scaffolding from tipping into the building or structure. Supported scaffolds with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1 must be restrained by guying, tying, bracing, or an equivalent means. Not using outriggers Sincerely, • The scaffold poles, legs, posts, frames and uprights should be plumb, braced to prevent swaying and displacement and rest on base plates or other firm foundation. Prevention of supported scaffolding platform from tipping . . As the Agency stated in a 1983 letter2. vertical ties repeat every 26 feet or less for scaffolds that are greater than 3 feet in width; and scaffolds with a height-to-base ratio of greater than 4:1 are restrained from tipping by guying, tying or bracing. For a scaffold with a narrow base width of less than 1.2 m, the height of The table below shows at what height OSHA's restraint provision (§1926.451(c)(1)) would require the indicated scaffold model, when used without outriggers, to be restrained (by guying, tying, bracing, or equivalent means) to prevent tipping. Alternatively, guardrail systems, canopies, or catch platforms may be installed to retain materials. [ back to text ], 2Agency's October 13, 1983, letter from John B. A supported scaffold with a height-to-base ratio (including outriggers supports, if used) of more than four to one (4:1) shall be restrained from tipping by guying, tying, bracing or equivalent means as follows: . The height of the scaffold work platform does not exceed the height to base width ratio defined in AS4576. The aspect ratio of molded feature height versus feature width for scaffolds was as high as 5:1 (150-μm strut height; 30-μm strut width), which exceeded previous reports for replica-molded PGS scaffolds in which the feature height-versus-width ratios were 2:1 or lower. Except as provided in paragraphs (a)(2), (a)(3), (a)(4), (a)(5) and (g) of this section, each scaffold and scaffold component shall be capable of supporting, without failure, its own weight and at least 4 times the maximum intended load applied or transmitted to it. How can one prevent supported scaffolding from tipping? A platform greater than 10 feet in length shall not extend over its support more than 18 inches, unless it is designed and installed so that the cantilevered portion of the platform is able to support employees without tipping, or has guardrails which block employee access to the cantilevered end; Page 4 3.4.1.10. Is this, in fact, permitted? Please consult the OSHA standard 29 CFR 1926.451 for these types of scaffold situations. Or, it could be 1920 x 1080, 1280 x 720, or any other width/height combinations that can be calculated to equal 16:9. Employees are required to wear hardhats on scaffolding to protect them dropped items. [ back to text ], Occupational Safety & Health Administration. First, please note that OSHA neither approves nor endorses products. (c) Criteria for supported scaffolds. 1 If (as one example) the user were to add 2-foot outriggers at each corner and perpendicular to the long side of the scaffold base section, the base width dimension would increase to such an extent that it becomes greater than the nominal length. So a 2 feet wide scaffold may reach 8 feet in height without using restraints. (1) You must make sure supported scaffolds with a height to least base di-mension ratio of greater than four to one are prevented from tipping by one or more of the following: (a) Guying; (b) Tying; (c) Bracing; (d) Other equivalent means. Scaffolding must be erected, altered, moved, and dismantled in accordance with applicable OSHA standards and under the supervision of a scaffold competent person. Supported scaffolds platform with a height to base width ratio of more than 4:1 must be restrained by guying, tying, bracing, or an equivalent means. • Any scaffold with a height-to-base width ratio of 4-to-1 or greater should be restrained from tipping by means of outriggers, guying, tying or bracing. All scaffolds with a height to base ratio of more than four to one must be secured to the structure or guyed to prevent the scaffold from tipping over. Note that our enforcement guidance may be affected by changes to OSHA rules. Question 1(b): Non-mandatory Appendix E to Subpart L purports to contain two illustrations of the maximum vertical tie spacing on supported scaffolds as required by §:1926.451(c)(1)(ii). The platform height of a rolling scaffold must not exceed four (4) times the smallest base dimension (Cal/OSHA and some Government agencies require a stricter ratio of 3 to 1) Always keep casters locked while on scaffold. In the United States, the OSHA requires such bracing when a scaffold's height to width ratio 4 to 1 or greater. We attempted to resolve that with you, but we were unable to obtain a response; consequently, our office closed the file. Using outriggers Based on the information you provided, we were unable to calculate the scaffold's total height. OSHA's decision to reject that suggestion was explained in the Preamble's discussion of §:1926.451(c)(1)(ii) in Volume 61 of the Federal Register at page 46042: We appreciate your pointing out that the captions in the Non-mandatory Appendix are in error. missing parts due to area obstructions). OSHA does not agree with the SIA suggestion that guys, ties, and braces be installed at the closest horizontal member. OSHA requirements are set by statute, standards and regulations. • The scaffold components, if produced by different manufacturers or with dissimilar materials, should fit together without force, while maintaining the structural integrity of the scaffold.

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